UK Varsity Applications Witness A Growth Of 4 Percent

Applications for UK universities have soared by 4% compared with last year’s parameters. More women have applied than men this time. This precedence have propelled warnings that men are getting marginalized in terms of attending universities since they are less likely to apply than the fairer sex. Ucas statistics reveal a whopping 87, 000 more women have applied this year. The survey chief Curnock Cook opines that this “stubborn gap” necessitates immediate attention. A total of 5, 80, 000 pupils have applied for undergraduate courses for the ensuing academic year as compared to the 5, 59, 000 applications last year.

Despite a slight dip in applications from Northern Ireland, the numbers remained substantial enough throughout the country. The authorities take applications till 15 January, a pivotal date for applying candidates. However, students can apply for courses resuming this autumn. Figures reveal that though density of 18 year olds has shrunk in the population, their application rates have been on the highest level this time. The survey unravels that 35 percent of this lot in England have enrolled for varsity courses. There were some apprehensions regarding the increased tuition rates introduced in 2012 would thwart people from applying. There was a substantial drop in students applying from UK that year.

Ucas survey shows that young people from depraved or disadvantaged areas in UK are twice as likely to apply as compared to their 2004 parameters. Ms Cook said that this analysis reveals a fantastically persistent rise in demand for quality, higher education from every demographic background. This caters to every institution across the educational panorama of England. The alarming void between female and male applicants remain a concerned amidst encouraging signs of demand from disadvantaged and mature students. Current trend suggest that this chasm can possibly eclipse the economic and social divide between the poor and the rich within a decade.

Pertaining to the issue of disadvantaged students, Paul Clark, a member of authority in UK representing the country’s universities, welcomed the enhancement in applications. He said that the 2012 fee increase did not deter students from applying in academic courses. These institutions have been successful in roping in poor students. 2013 witnessed the highest every application matrix throughout the country, he added. The data also unravels a steady recovery in the volume of mature students enrolling for degrees, although they are yet to match the 2010 levels. Sutton Trust educational charity member, Conor Ryan welcomes the positive change following the upsurge of applications from the lower echelons of society. The remaining 2.5 fold void certainly attention, he affirmed.